Piper Navajo PA 31 – Operating Costs, Specifications, and Performance Data

Compare the fixed costs, variable cost, and performance of Piper Navajo PA 31 to over 500 jets, turboprops, helicopters and piston aircraft, with accurate data from Conklin & de Decker.

Summary

FULL AIRCRAFT NAME
Piper Navajo PA 31
AIRCRAFT NAME
Navajo PA 31
AIRCRAFT MANUFACTURER
Piper
RANGE
640 nm
MAX RANGE (30 MIN RESERVE)
927 nm
SPEED
226 kts
PASSENGERS
7 people
ACQUISITION COST
$225000
ENGINES
Lycoming Ly TIO-540-A2C 2
WINGSPAN
40.7 ft
IFR CERTIFIED
Yes

Aircraft History

The PA-31 Navajo and Navajo Chieftain were Piper’s entry into the cabin class twin and also formed the basis for the Cheyenne turboprop series. Introduced in 1967, the Navajo was Piper’s answer to the 400 series Cessna twins. Given Piper’s success with the PA-28 formula of many models from one design, it is no surprise they did the same with the Navajo. The aircraft was produced in six different variants and two fuselage lengths (not counting the turboprops).
 
The Navajo PA-31-310 had two turbocharged 310 hp Lycoming TIO-540 engines. Throughout its production run into the early 1980s, the 310 hp Navajo saw numerous small improvements. The aircraft was popular with both charter operators and small companies. Approximately 1,824 PA-31s were produced. If you do not need the extra cabin size of the Chieftain, the PA-31-310 is a capable airplane.
 
Like most Piper products, the Navajo handles well and is fairly predictable. As with most twins, engine-out situations exist where level flight on one engine is not possible. Given the many Navajo models, it is surprising to note that the book performance across the line is surprisingly close.