M7 Aerospace Merlin 300/IIIC – Operating Costs, Specifications, and Performance Data

Compare the fixed costs, variable cost, and performance of M7 Aerospace Merlin 300/IIIC to over 500 jets, turboprops, helicopters and piston aircraft, with accurate data from Conklin & de Decker.

Summary

FULL AIRCRAFT NAME
M7 Aerospace Merlin 300/IIIC
AIRCRAFT NAME
Merlin 300/IIIC
AIRCRAFT MANUFACTURER
M7 Aerospace
RANGE
1290 nm
SPEED
295 kts
PASSENGERS
6 people
ACQUISITION COST
$450000
ENGINES
Honeywell Engines TPE 331-10U 2
AVIONICS
Universal Avionics Glass Cockpit (Upgrade)
APU
Optional
WINGSPAN
46.3 ft
IFR CERTIFIED
Yes

Aircraft History

In 1959, Swearingen Aircraft was formed by Ed Swearingen. The company initially performed contract work for other manufacturers, until 1964 when they designed the SA-26 Merlin 1. That aircraft was a piston-powered twin similar to the Beech Queen Air and Twin Bonanza. In 1965, turboprops were added and the aircraft became the SA-26T Merlin II, followed by the Merlin IIA a year later. In 1968, Swearingen and Fairchild-Hiller cooperated on a 19- to 22-seat commuter airliner and called it the Metro.
 
In early 1970, Fairchild Industries acquired Swearingen and developed the A-10 Thunderbolt II (Warthog) for the U.S. Air Force. In 1996, the company took over Dornier assets and was renamed Fairchild Dornier. In 1999, the company was acquired by Allianz A.G. and a U.S. investment group, before M7 Aerospace acquired the Type Certificate in April 2003.
The company relocated to San Antonio, Texas, before being purchased at the end of 2010 by defense contractor, Elbit Systems.