Bell 429 – Operating Costs, Specifications, and Performance Data

Compare the fixed costs, variable cost, and performance of Bell 429 to over 500 jets, turboprops, helicopters and piston aircraft, with accurate data from Conklin & de Decker.

Summary

FULL AIRCRAFT NAME
Bell 429
AIRCRAFT NAME
429
AIRCRAFT MANUFACTURER
Bell
MAX RANGE (30 MIN RESERVE)
276 nm
SPEED
155 kts
PASSENGERS
7 people
ACQUISITION COST
$7200000
ENGINES
Pratt && Whitney Canada PW207D1 2
WINGSPAN
8.8 ft
IFR CERTIFIED
Yes

Aircraft History

The Bell 429 is a light twin-engine helicopter based on the 427 but with a bigger cabin.  The Bell 429 is capable of single-pilot IFR and Runway Category A operations. Development began in 2004 and 136 orders were made the first year.
 
The Bell 429 has a four-blade rotor system with soft-in-plane flex beams. The rotor blades are composite and have swept tips for reduced noise. The tail rotor is made by stacking a pair of two-blade rotors at uneven intervals (to form an X) for reduced noise. The passenger cabin provides 130 cubic feet of space and comes with a flat floor for patient loading in EMS configuration. A set of rear clamshell doors under tail boom is optional for easier patient loading.
 
The 429 has a glass cockpit with three-axis autopilot and flight director standard. Standard landing gear are skids. A retractable wheel landing gear is optional and adds 5 knots to cruising speed. The main transmission is rated for 5,000 hours between overhauls and the tail-rotor gearbox is rated for 3,200 hours.
 
The prototype first flew on February 27, 2007, and received type certification on July 1, 2009.